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Wednesday, October 1, 2008


Valley News at a Glance


Water project in Pinesdale funded - By Michael Howell

Historic millstones to be donated to Stevensville Museum - By Michael Howell

Pianist needed

Road work on Skalkaho-Rye Road

‘Hunt for the Hungry’

4-H Cloverbud group

Volunteers needed

Valley Bible Church moves to Stevensville

Births

Obituaries




Water project in Pinesdale funded - By Michael Howell

The Fires of 2000, they are called. There were many of them and they made an indelible impression on valley residents from Sula to Lolo.

The residents of Pinesdale were particularly impressed by the fire that came roaring out of Blodgett Canyon. It burned right up to the community’s doorstep. Four structures burned before the fire was pushed back. At the height of the emergency, the town’s water treatment system was shut down and the water diverted into an irrigation system to be used for firefighting purposes. It gave the residents something to think about: the vulnerability of their watershed to catastrophic fire and the inadequacy of the town’s water system for emergency purposes.

Town officials teamed up with the Bitterroot National Forest to thin and under-burn the heavily timbered forest in the steep drainage just above the town. They teamed up with the state and the federal government to upgrade their water system to improve residential service and emergency services. The plan calls for increasing storage capacity by adding a 500,000 gallon storage tank, which will increase pressure in the system as well. Replacing the current leaky water line with a new 12-inch mainline will improve residential service. And several new fire hydrants will increase emergency preparedness.

Top state officials involved in the funding process for the water system improvements were present in Pinesdale last week for an award ceremony in which oversized checks were presented to the community. These included Director of the Department of Commerce Tony Preite, Treasure State Endowment Program (TSEP) manager Jim Edgcomb, and Administrator of the state’s Community Development Division, Dave Cole, and Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program manager, Gus Byrom. They handed over two oversized checks to the community, one a CDBG grant for $450,000 and the other a TSEP grant for $750,000.

Chairman of the Town’s Board, Rocky Weidow, thanked the men for the grant money and said that it was being put to good use and would be a big help to the community.

Local legislators Bob Lake and Ron Stoker were also in attendance for the check presentation.

“It’s an excellent example of federal, state and local people coming together to do something good for the community,” said Stoker.

The $2.8 million water system improvement project is also being funded by a grant from the Rural Development Program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Weidow said that construction is planned to start next spring and finish in 2009.

According to Department of Commerce records, the last TSEP grant received by Pinesdale was a grant of $13,800 for water system improvements in 2003. The Town previously received a CDBG grant of $378,105 for water in 1985, then a grant of $7,700 for its water system in 2004.

Darby and Hamilton both submitted similar grant requests in 2007 and each received a total of $750,000 in TSEP funds and $450,000 in CDBG funds this year. Hamilton’s grants are being used for wastewater treatment improvements, while Darby’s funds are being used for water.

Ravalli County has also received a lot of TSEP and CDBG money over the years.

It received TSEP funds of $410,760 in 1999 for wastewater in Corvallis. It was awarded $500,000 in 2001 for wastewater in Florence, but the money was never used as the local residents rejected the idea.

CDBG funds are granted for a variety of projects besides water and sewer. They are awarded for housing projects, planning studies, health facilities and many other things. From 1995 through 2006 the county received about $2,831,052 for a dozen different projects, several of them business loans to Victor Merc, Big Sky Mushroom, Bitterroot Restoration, and Corixa Corporation. Other grants were for planning projects such as developing the Growth Policy, a feasibility study for SAFE, and a Bio-med Business Park.

Combined totals of CDBG and TSEP money awarded to cities in the valley over the years are:

Hamilton: between 1990 and 2007 - $5,370,473

Darby: between 1999 and 2007 - $1,356,000

Pinesdale: between 1985 and 2007 - $1,599,605

Stevensville: between 1987 and 2007 - $600,879 (Stevensville is currently applying for significant grants for water and wastewater improvements)



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Historic millstones to be donated to Stevensville Museum - By Michael Howell

In the early days of settlement in Montana one of the first grist mills for grinding grain into flour was built east of Stevensville up the Burnt Fork of the Bitterroot. Wheat from around the area was sent there to be ground into flour. But over the years the grist mill was abandoned and the millstones left to deteriorate.

The old mill site was located near the mouth of the Burnt Fork canyon on land that eventually fell into the hands of the Miller family. When that land was sold the millstones ended up being moved to the Miller ranch land lower down on the creek.

At one point John and Vonnie Miller decided to take the millstones down to the Stevensville School and place them on display. An appropriate display was constructed and the millstones remained there for some time. Vandalism began to take a toll on the millstones, however, and John and Vonnie decided to take the millstones back to their ranch. They sat at the ranch for the last twenty years.

Following John’s death, Vonnie reached the point that she could no longer take care of the place and decided to sell it and move to town. The new owner, Tom Beasley, became aware of the old millstones, did some research and developed a real interest in them. When the current owner of the original mill site offered to buy them from him, Beasley decided that instead the millstones should be returned to Vonnie Miller, with the hopes that Miller would donate them to the public for a historical display.

Miller agreed to the idea. Her son Scott Miller and Stevensville Mayor Bill Meisner agreed to do what they could to restore the millstones. The Stevensville Museum has agreed to accept the millstones and arrange an appropriate display at the Stevensville Museum on Main Street. A ceremony is planned for this Friday at 5:30 p.m. at which the stones will be officially donated to the Stevensville Historical Museum. The public is welcome to attend.



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Pianist needed

Stevensville Playhouse is looking for a pianist for “You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown.” Show dates are Dec. 5, 6, 12, 13, 19 and 20 at 8 p.m. and Dec. 7, 14 and 21 at 2 p.m., plus rehearsal time in November. The compensation for the entire run of the show will be $300. Call 777-2722 or 360-9121.



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Road work on Skalkaho-Rye Road

Bitterroot National Forest officials will be repairing the Skalkaho-Rye Road #75 at mile point 9.5 beginning on Monday, September 29. The road will be impassable to traffic from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Thursday while work is in progress. Work is expected to last two weeks.

This location is near the Black Bear Road #1371, north of the intersection with the Two Bear Road #720 that connects down into the Sleeping Child Road. The Two Bear road should be used for access to points along Road #75, south of the repair site.

For any questions, contact the Bitterroot National Forest at 363-7100.



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‘Hunt for the Hungry’

Do you have extra game that you can donate to Pantry Partners Food Bank? All you need to do is take the harvested game to Hamilton Pack. The Pantry pays for processing. Last year’s professionally processed game still in your freezer can also be donated. If you are not a hunter you can make a donation to help pay for processing. For info call the Pantry at 777-0351.



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4-H Cloverbud group

Come join the new 4-H Cloverbud group forming in the valley! Children ages 5-8 are invited to join the fun! Call 777-2896 or e-mail: valleycloverbuds@yahoo.com for more information.



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Volunteers needed

Volunteers are needed at the Hamilton Senior Center, 820 N. 4th Street. Cooks and cooks helpers are needed for two breakfasts held on the first and third Saturday of every month to cook pancakes, bacon, eggs and dish up. Servers are needed as well as helpers to do dishes, set up tables and clear. Volunteers are needed to help with M-W-F lunches weekly. Extra people are needed to fill in for those already helping. (Need not be a member) There is also a Flea Market on the second Saturday that is staffed by volunteers. These are all fundraisers for the center. For more information call 363-2198 (early am or evening or leave a message).



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Valley Bible Church moves to Stevensville

The Valley Bible Church has moved to south Stevensville on the Eastside Highway between the Riverside Cemetery Road and Park Place. Valley Bible organized as a church almost two years ago for the purpose of teaching the fundamentals of the plan of salvation that leads to the regeneration of individuals by the Holy Spirit of God, teaching a comprehension of the basic doctrines contained in the Scriptures, and teaching the principles of the great commission. You’re invited to bring your Bible and join in the teaching and worship services. Services begins this Sunday, October 5 with Sunday School at 10 a.m., Sunday worship at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m., and a Wednesday service at 7 p.m.



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Births

Scarlett Bleu Gard

Libby Costello Gard and Karson Gard are the proud parents of a baby girl, Scarlett Bleu Gard, born August 21 in Portland, Oregon. Scarlett weighed in at 7 lbs., 5 oz., and was 20 inches long. She joins brothers Brogan and Luke. Paternal grandparents are Joe and Judi Gard of Tucson, AZ . Maternal grandparents are Marvin and Mary Costello of Stevensville.

Births at Marcus Daly Hospital, Hamilton

9-21-08

Boy, 8 lbs., 13 oz., 21-1/2 inches, to Jennifer and Douglas Ferraro, Victor




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Obituaries

Atlanta Manicke
1919-2008

Greatness is not always recognized on a boardroom plaque, or noted in a newspaper article or written in the annals of history. Sometimes greatness comes and goes quietly, as it did with Atlanta MacMurtrey Taylor Manicke who passed peacefully on September 4, 2008 at Marcus Daly Hospice Center.

Atlanta was born November 8, 1919 in Troy, Montana to country school teachers Leland Benjamin and Mary Atlanta (MacMurtrey) Taylor. She was their seventh and last child, and her early years were marked by poverty and adversity. Often Atlanta’s parents had to leave their Troy homestead to obtain teaching positions, and one of Atlanta’s first recollections happened on a cold winter morning in Hamilton. Atlanta was in a horse drawn carriage, asleep beneath a buffalo robe, and when she awoke all she could see were two horses’ behinds.  This was to portend Atlanta’s future as she later spent decades staring at the bare behinds of her 11 children while changing their diapers.

As Atlanta grew old enough to attend school, she was often left in the care of her older siblings. Times were tough and there were occasions when she and her siblings would sneak to the neighbors’ garden to pinch outer cabbage leaves to eat.  These earlier experiences led to a lifetime of frugality – and a passion for food.

At the age of 15, Atlanta met her husband, Forrest Raymond Manicke, while swimming in the School House Lake outside of Troy. Too shy to be seen in her swimming suit in front of this tall young man, Atlanta delayed exiting the water for as long as possible. When finally she did, Forrest was smitten. Five years later on October 23, 1938 he married his 5’6” 105 pound beauty. Their union spanned nearly 70 years of enduring love, eleven children and all of life’s joys and challenges.

Forrest and Atlanta’s married life saw them travel from Northwest Montana to Idaho, Washington, Oregon, Alaska, California and back to Montana for retirement. While Forrest variously worked managing a creamery, operating a small trucking business, and jobs in the construction and logging industries, Atlanta staffed the home front with an unparalleled industriousness.  There was always the smell of homemade bread wafting through the house and a full dinner on the table, available to any and all visitors.  As if eleven kids were not enough, Atlanta and Forrest also took in and nurtured numerous foster children, some of whom are now a part of the family.

Atlanta possessed a great intellect and sense of humor. She loved to read, a good joke, and playing pinochle.  She relished gardening, traveling, and writing short stories. She was a life long student and took courses at the University of Montana and other colleges where she lived.  She was always so proud of her children and delighted in their devotion. Atlanta was a member of the Christian Science Church, and her religion was her guiding force and constant comfort. Although a few column inches could never sum up her life, she lived it with love, honor and integrity. Atlanta was a remarkable woman and achieved greatness in her own way.

Predeceasing her are her parents; brothers Tom (Gladys), Ben (Martha) and Harold; and sisters Natalie (Milton) Manicke and Hallie (Winton) Weydemeyer.

Atlanta is survived by her husband Forrest, Hamilton; a sister Dorothy Albertson, Santa Clara, CA; and her children: Forrest, Langlois, OR; Bruce (Mel) Bandon, OR; Richard (Jan) Portland, OR; Raymond (Jane) Reedsport, OR; Sharon (Bob) Martin, Boring, OR; Mary (Denny) Leiseth, Sandy, OR; James (Sandy), Boise, ID; Jan (Arnie) Polanchek, Stevensville, MT; Pete (Brenda) Ketchikan, AK; Beverly (Jim) Moor, San Diego, CA and Roberta (Mike) McDonald, Portland, OR.

Cremation has taken place by the Whitesitt Funeral Home in Stevensville and a celebration of Atlanta’s life will be held at a later date.

Sincere gratitude for Cynthia Demmons, Dr. Kirk Crews and everyone at the Marcus Daly Hospice Center.

Memorials in Atlanta’s honor may be directed to Marcus Daly Hospice.




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