Click for Stevensville, Montana Forecast

Enter City/State/Zipcode/Country

Bitterroot Star Masthead
Page One Valley News Op/Ed Sports Calendar Classifieds Links About Us Back Issues Email Us Web Ad Rates Home

Your ad here!

Call for web rates
777-3928


Montana Summer Info
Osprey's Baseball
Camping in Montana
Fishing in Montana
Montana Stream Flows
Rent a Fire Lookout Cabin
Montana Fire, Science & Technology Center
Large Incident Fire Map


Contact The Star

Subscribe to the Star
$30/year
Place Classified Ad
Display Ad Rates
Submit Press Release
Letter To The Editor

Outdoors In Montana

Montana Forest Service Recreation
Check The Weather
Montana Ski Conditions
Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks
Montana National Parks

Local/State Info

Montana Fire Information
Montana Forest Service
Bitterroot Valley Night Life
Find A Movie
Dining Guide
Bitterroot Valley Chamber of Commerce
Real Estate
Jobs


Your ad here!

Call for web rates
777-3928
 

Wednesday, August 6, 2008


Valley News at a Glance


Pastor hopes to establish faith based mental health center

Local conservation group reception at Teller

Bitterroot National Forest wildfire update

Comments sought on shooting range projects

Poker Joe Fishing Access Site open

Stordahl to compete for Miss Teen title

Volunteer drivers needed

Calling all Navy WAVES

Duck Derby winners




Pastor hopes to establish faith based mental health center

Pastor Pat Goldson, a licensed clinical pastoral counselor in Hamilton, has some very ambitious plans for helping those in the community with mental health issues. He hopes to establish a multiple program operation and facility in the county to offer a variety of services.

Goldson is licensed through the National Christian Counselors Association and has been practicing in the valley under his own shingle. But he feels the community needs more and he hopes to pull together the people and the money that can make it happen.

The plan is to establish a crisis stabilization center complete with counselors, case managers, and physicians who can offer many levels of treatment, including a combination of religious counseling as well as mental health treatment. It could involve a soup kitchen where the needy can get a meal, or gas money or money for food, as well as help in transitioning to employment.

The facility and the treatment program would be developed under the auspices of an already established non-profit organization called Whole Health Ministries Inc.

Goldson has a BA in Psychology and his Masters work was in domestic violence and crisis intervention. He has previous experience working in a mental health center and his wife Becky, who is also a pastor, has a Masters degree in family systems and women’s issues. He said that she will be serving in an advisory capacity.

An organizational meeting is planned for Thursday, August 7 at 7 p.m. in the first floor conference room at the Old Mill located at 140 Cherry Street in Hamilton. That’s two blocks north of Main Street at the corner of North 2nd Street and Cherry Street.

Goldson is excited about the meeting and said that many participants had already been lined up, including someone from the Department of Justice Probation program, representatives from Marcus Daly Hospital, the Ravalli County Sheriff’s Chaplain, a representative from Summit Independent Living Center, other therapists, doctors and pastors.

“We want to help the whole community by helping those with mental health issues,” he said. He said there will be people there giving testimony to the positive benefits of therapy and also giving Christian testimony. Anyone interested in helping make the Bitterroot Clinical Pastoral Counseling Center a success is welcome to attend.



Back to top



Local conservation group reception at Teller

Aspiring local conservationist Rebecca Miller is hosting a reception at the Teller Wildlife Refuge on August 12 to support the Mexico based non-profit, Rainforest2Reef. Only 21 years old and a recent graduate of the University of San Francisco, Miller is already demonstrating her dedication to conservation by providing a venue for Rainforest2Reef to present their successful rainforest conservation project to her local community.

Miller and her family have been integrally involved with the protecting the Teller Wildlife Refuge for generations, but it wasn’t until a recent visit with Rainforest2Reef scientists to the Calakmul region of the southern Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico that Miller gained a global perspective on conservation.

“I became involved with Rainforest2Reef three years ago, and recently returned from an intense, life-changing trip to the Selva Maya Rainforest with the Rainforest2Reef staff. On the trip I participated in jaguar research and visited the Calakmul ruins. When I stood at the top of the Calakmul ruins, I understood the vastness of the land Rainforest2Reef is protecting, and I fully realized the importance of their work to protect biodiversity and mitigate global warming,” says Miller.

“It was amazing to observe first hand Rainforest2Reef’s innovative model for conservation, which simultaneously addresses the threats of climate change, biodiversity loss, and poverty in indigenous communities.”

Since its founding in 2000, Rainforest2Reef’s conservation efforts have resulted in the permanent protection of 300,000 acres of the pristine Selva Maya, the second largest rainforest in the Americas. This land provides habitat to more than 60,000 species of flora and fauna, including jaguars and 130 other endangered species. The Calakmul Biosphere Reserve, where Rainforest2Reef works, is home to 500 jaguars, and is the only contiguous rainforest in Central America large enough to maintain a viable jaguar population.

Calakmul also provides habitat for more then 350 species of birds. This represents 33% of all bird species in Mexico. Many of these are neo-tropical migratory birds that come from the United States, and spend part of the year south of the border.

Rainforest2Reef protects the pristine rainforest within the Buffer Zone of the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve by signing binding and permanent conservation agreements with indigenous landowners. Although these agreements are legally binding, they are currently dependent on annual payments from the international community.

Rainforest2Reef’s efforts have also prevented millions of tons of carbon dioxide from entering the atmosphere.

“Most people are not aware that the loss of tropical forests is the leading cause of global warming, and this is something we need to consider in our efforts to fight climate change,” says Cheri Sugal, Rainforest2Reef’s Executive Director.

“After traveling to Calakmul with Rebecca, sharing laughs and the magic of the Selva Maya, we are looking forward to bringing our project to her friends and family,” Sugal says.

Miller chose the Teller Wildlife Refuge, which is locally referred to as “The Teller”, as the location for the reception due to her long history at the Teller. Some of Miller’s earliest memories include running through the Teller with her brothers and cousins picking morel mushrooms and identifying birds. Her family has been involved with protecting the Teller for generations. Miller’s great uncle, Otto Teller, founded the Refuge in 1988, and her Uncle Chris Miller managed the Teller for years.

Otto Teller left a legacy by founding the Teller. The 1200-acre wildlife refuge, located at the heart of the Bitterroot Valley, encompasses a variety of habitats, including rivers, streams, spring creeks, irrigation ditches, emergent and open water wetlands, uplands and agricultural fields.

Miller notes, “The Teller is one of the most magical places in the world, and is without doubt where I first started appreciating wildlife and what it takes to preserve it. With this in mind, I became involved with wildlife preservation in Mexico with Rainforest2Reef, so it seems natural to incorporate both of my passions with this event.”

For more information about Rainforest2Reef, or to make a donation, visit: www.rainforest2reef.org.



Back to top



Bitterroot National Forest wildfire update

As of Saturday, August 2, there are three fires on the Bitterroot National Forest. Each is being managed as a “wildland fire use fire”; rather than actively fighting or suppressing the fires, Forest managers are utilizing these fires to generate resource benefits

The newest fire, the Arrasta Fire, is approximately 0.5–1 acre in size. Discovered on Friday afternoon, this fire is probably a holdover from Tuesday’s lightning storm. It is burning in the Burnt Fork drainage southeast of Stevensville.

The Hells Half Saddle Fire, now at 300 acres, was started by lightning on June 30, and is located between Round Top and Pole Mountains, south of the Magruder Corridor. The fire has crossed Forest Service Road #224; no travel restrictions are planned but forest users should watch for burned snags and areas of active burning.

The Woodhump Fire is located in the upper reaches of the Selway River approximately 1 mile southwest of Woodhump Mountain. Started by lightning on July 18, the fire has burned approximately 195 acres.

For additional information, call Forest Public Affairs Officer Nan Christianson at 531-1130.



Back to top



Library storytimes

The North Valley Public Library's 2008 summer reading program, "Catch the Reading Bug" ended on July 30 with a picnic, certificates and prizes for all participants. Approximately 40 children fluttered, crawled and inched their way through the program this summer with Moms and Grandmas (and a Dad or two) in tow. Every Wednesday, the reading bugs listened to stories, made crafts and ate snacks created by volunteers Sandra Wilson and Georgia Hall.

No regular library story times are scheduled for the month of August, but Miss Sandy and Miss Georgia will be hosting two "Stories in the Park" events at Lewis and Clark park on August 13 and 17, both Wednesdays at 11 a.m.

Regular weekly story times will resume in the Community Room at the North Valley Public Library (208 Main Street, Stevensville) on Wednesday, September 10 at 11 a.m. All children and their parents or caregivers are welcome. No pre-registration is required. Call the library at 777-5061 for more information.



Back to top



Poker Joe Fishing Access Site open

Poker Joe Fishing Access Site (FAS) on the Bitterroot River between Florence and Stevensville is now open to the public after being closed for most of July for the construction of a new, larger parking area.



Back to top



Stordahl to compete for Miss Teen title

Jade Stordahl, daughter of John and Wanda Stordahl of Stevensville, will be among the candidates competing for the title of Miss Teen of Montana at the 2008 State Pageant, which will be held August 15-16 in Billings.

Jade Stordahl will be a junior this fall at Stevensville High School. She is on the Volleyball Team and the Track and Field Team. Jade also plays the flute in Symphonic Band. Being on the Honor Roll, in honors classes and having good grades has helped Jade to be entered in this competition.

The winner of the pageant competition will receive a $1,000 cash scholarship and a $1,000 U.S. Savings Bond. The new State Titleholder will also be eligible to compete for the National Title of Miss Teen of America and vie for additional scholarships, awards and prizes.

Each state candidate will be scored in five judging categories: Scholastic Record, Achievement and Service to School and Community, Personal Development of Talents and Skills, Personality Projection in Formal Wear, and Interview. National Pageant Founder, Warren Alexander, stated, “This pageant truly represents the young women in the Twenty-First Century. Sixty percent of the judging involves written resumes detailing each girl’s accomplishments, with the strongest single category being her interview with the judges.”

The State Pageant Finals will be held at 8 p.m. on Saturday, August 16 in the Holiday Inn Grand Montana Ballroom. The event is open to the general public, and tickets will be available for purchase at the door.



Back to top



Volunteer drivers needed

Transportation is a problem for many cancer patients who cannot drive themselves to treatment or who don’t have a family member available to drive them.  Road to Recovery volunteers give their time and the use of their vehicles to provide friendly, supportive, and a reliable presence to offer free transportation to and from cancer-related medical appointments. If you have some extra time and could volunteer for the Road to Recovery, contact Amanda at the American Cancer Society at 728-1004 for more information and an application.



Back to top



Calling all Navy WAVES

Looking to reconnect with other WWII Navy WAVES. Call 777-2441.



Back to top



Duck Derby winners

A crowd gathered Sunday at the Supply Ditch to see if their duck would be a winner. The ducks floated well. The weather was great. All had a good time. The Duck Race winners were:

1st Place - $500, Greg Chilcott
2nd place - $300, Robin Holcomb
3rd place - $200, Ron Toomer
4th place - $100, Tom Dobberstein
5th place - $75, Janna Wells
6th place - $50, Shirley Jacobs
7th place - $10, Susie Wortman
Last place - $10, Bob Smith.



Back to top



Page One Valley News Op/Ed Sports Calendar Classifieds Links About Us Back Issues Email Us Home

©2008 Bitterroot Star
This site was Done By Dooney